The “Just Quit” Mentality

The “Just Quit” Mentality

I’ve seen a lot of memes going around the interwebs about being miserable and quitting your job. I’m not here to tell you DON’T quit your job, but I am telling you to do it the right way.

I once worked a job where I felt trapped; I hated driving to work every day, I hated doing the actual job, I hated the management structure and felt like I was lying to my customers. This made me miserable, and I took it out on my friends and family (sorry about that, guys). I felt so trapped that instead of quitting, I just stopped doing my job so I would get fired. And guess what? I got fired. Happiest day of my life (seriously, it really was. I treated myself to tickets to the Backstreet Boys reunion tour that happened that night #bsbforever).

Now, was that the right thing to do? Probably not, but I did it. I don’t regret it and it helped me get into recruitment. 

So, you hate your job. Guess what? You’re in control of this situation. You have the ability to get out of your small cubical and never see your coworker who refuses to chew their food the correct way, or the boss who micromanages you. You can leave it, but do it the right way.

The first thing you want to do is update your resume (Hi - this is what I do for a living). When I update mine, I take my “official” job description, read it, and make any tweaks I find necessary. Your job description may have changed in the last odd years you’ve worked there, so it’s a good idea to add those new responsibilities. Once you feel good about your resume, re-read it just one more time. Put yourself in the shoes of a recruiter or HR Manager. We take 9 seconds on average to read a resume, and I only care about three things:

1)     Your education. If you’re paying students loans, you better make sure your education is above your work history. I did not pay $65K for a piece of paper to put it at the bottom of my resume.

2)     Bullet point. I don’t have enough time in the world to sit and read your paragraph of what you do at your job. Keep it simple, keep it bulleted.

3)     Dates of employment. Please, for the love of God, keep this in chronological order and have the month and year. That’s all I ask.

The rest is up to you. I love seeing computer programs you know, or organizations you’re involved in. Try to shove as many “buzz” words in your resume as possible. Do what you need to do to get noticed.

Now it’s time to put the resume to good use; it’s not illegal to put your resume up on job sites while working. Plaster your resume on sights like Indeed, Careerbuilder, Monster, and Zip Recruiter. The more you’re out there, the more recruiters will see you.

Apply. Apply. Apply. I don’t care if you apply to a job that’s totally out of your comfort zone - APPLY. There’s recruitment math, people. Let’s say you apply to 10 jobs, about 4 of them might be interested in you, and you might get 1-2 interviews out of them. The chances of getting an offer you appreciate is pretty slim.

Not to sound bleak, but that sucks. Apply to all the applicable jobs on multiple job boards to help your chances. Why not? If you don’t get a call back, wasn’t meant to be. You’re in control of your career. Stop settling for a job you hate going to. Change your mentality, change your job, help your career.

When I Grow Up I Want To Be... A Recruiter!

When I Grow Up I Want To Be... A Recruiter!

Welcome to You're Hired Rochester!

Welcome to You're Hired Rochester!